Pot Businesses Seek Trademarks From the State

Marijuana businesses in California that aren’t able to get official trademarking from the federal government are hoping the state will soon step in and ensure their intellectual property rights.

“Not being able to trademark your brand is a huge setback if you’re trying to get capital investment,” said California Cannabis Industry Association lobbyist Nate Bradley. “If you’re not able to protect what you’re asking people to invest in, you’re not likely to get investments.”

That could all change thanks to Assembly Bill 64, which was recently introduced in the California Legislature. It would create state-level trademarks specifically for cannabis products and services since, right now, the Secretary of State is only able to register trademarks for items recognized by federal law.

Supporters of the bill are making the usual arguments about bringing people “out of the shadows.” But the law could also prevent hairy legal disputes. The bill hasn’t met with much opposition from Republican lawmakers or law enforcement groups—at least not yet. For now, they say they’re far more concerned with advertising to minors and issues affecting public safety.


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